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our president when the wind is too close to call. we do not expect to witness an election won by a landslide. some will look longingly on the time when one candidate dominated the political scene. lyndon johnson readily be barry goldwater and richard nixon overwhelming george mcgovern. in each of those elections, one of the candidates failed to capture the spirit of the american voting public. and the winner had the advantage of the weak opponent. franklin roosevelt won his second term, landslide, because of his huge popularity. however, in many more presidential elections, the candidates are in a heated battle to present themselves as the one best capable of serving the country with the winner walking off with the modest majority. it is a customary wisdom that the campaign between the incumbent president and his opponent will be either a referendum on the first term of the president, or a judgment of which candidate will be the better leader. is there really a difference between these two considerations? does not boil down to judging the leadership skill of the incumbent base
mile to assure the russians about future u.s. missile defense moves. >> after my election, i will be more flexible. >> it's going to be harder this time. i don't see where u.s./russian relations can productively go. that's going to be a big problem for the president, starting, of course, with syria. but ooh ran is the even bigger issue that is undecided. we have gotten some russian help, so far on iran. but it doesn't mean we will get russian help with the next step. >> the arab spring signaled the fall of middle-east leaders with whom u.s. officials had, for 30 years, cultivated careful relationships. president obama called on hosni mubarak to step down. >> a change must take place. >> allocated u.s. resources for a no-fly zone in libbia, leading to the killing of moammar khadafy. but while calling for bashir al-assad to step down, a war continues. >> overall, president obama's legacy toward the middle-east is one of limited american activism. that is carcaturd by how we handled egypt, libya, syria, iraq. >>. >> there are unanswered questions about the investigation into the
for re-election, the president is free to pursue the agenda that will enshrine him. among america's greats were abe lincoln and thomas jefferson. for this u.s. president, the first african-american ever elected to the office, the historical legacy has already been written before he officially began his first term. four years ago, president barack obama welcomed the weight of that legacy casting himself as a blank canvas to project our lofty hopes for change and great expectations for the nation. the first item on his agenda, that bright legacy and suggested those hopes were well placed. president obama tried and succeeded where previous democratic presidents tried and failed. he enacted legislation that provided universal health care for all americans. four years after the first inauguration our lofty hopes for what was possible have been dragged back down to earth by the cold hand of reality and a republican dominated house of representatives. this time around, our great expectations may feel like managed expectations. take a look at president obama's second term official portrai
elections, drowning out the voices of ordinary american citizens eager to participate in the political process. citizens united also epitomizes the so-called corporate personhood movement in which some now say the corporations are people. the fact is corporations are not people, and the constitution was never intended to give corporations the same rights as the american people. corporations don't breathe. they don't have kids, and they don't die in wars. my constituents continue to express concern about the growing influence of corporations in our political discourse. they're also demanding action on campaign finance reform because they are repulsed by the large amount of money in our campaigns. and quite frankly, they want elected officials to spend more time on policy, deliberating and debating on issues and less time dialing for dollars. unfortunately, the republican leadership in the house has failed to address these pressing issues during the past two years. they have been indifferent. we haven't had the opportunity to vote on any legislation to curb the influence of unlimited and
are up for re-election in north carolina or out west or down south or wherever they're from, i don't think he can lift it. and can that's what i'm talking about in terms of overreach. if this was something where you said close the loophole on gun shows, catch the 40% of people who are going into the shows and escaping, buying guns if they're mentally disturbed and we should catch that and reasonable restrictions. the problem in the heller case and what d.c. was doing is they said you couldn't have a gun unless you registered it, but then today wouldn't let you register it. i mean, that's an effective you can't do it. and that does, in fact, go too far. so if it's a common sense -- and, you know, quite frankly, i don't know why ten. i don't know why somebody needs ten bullets, let alone thirty. so ten doesn't seem like some magic number to me. and, again, to the gun owners, that sounds like something somebody made up, ten. so i think that the president'stive orders -- executive orders can be accepted by the republican party, and if they did the incremental approach of background che
beginning for him because the first time around, he was elected based on what he promised to do. and this time around, he feels he was elected on what he has done and what he can do in the years to come. and there, you're looking, again, at the president's church. and, george, i wonder what you were thinking this morning when you woke up, about this day because it is a day that gives a president we know a chance to start again, for the country. >> everything stops. everything is new for at least a moment. and he has that clear shot to speak to the entire country. and it feels like the one day where the entire country has ears to hear what the president has to say, as well. >> and one we can show the world also listening. we can show the world that after a hard-fought election, a bruising time in congress, that we are still together in this country. and i believe we have jon karl, white house correspondent, with us. he is also there on the west side of the capitol. jon? >> reporter: diane, i'm here. the divisions, the president will be surrounded, of course, by family and friends
. it was relatively easy it was unanimous that george washington had been elected president. the first thing they had to do was notify washington he needed to come to take his oath of office. it took a little while for presidents of the united states in those days to get to wherever the federal government was so they had a couple of weeks to work things out. well the first thing they did was to write an oath for everybody else to take including the vice president of the united states. congress write it is oath that every other person who works for the government from military to judges to the legislators. that is an oath written by congress and it's changed over the centuries. but the oath the president takes is unique. it's in the constitution and it's never changed. so the question was where are we going to swear in the president of the united states? well congress is meeting in federal hall on wall street. and it was a nice building. the house had the bigger room downstairs and the senate had the smaller room upstairs. and they said the president should be sworn in in our chamber. that was fine ex
of american freedom and democracy. for the 57th time in our history, a president freely elected by the people is being sworn in to office. just before noon at the capitol, barack obama will take the oath for his second term as president. this is a ceremonial swearing-in because the constitution requires the president to be sworn in on january 20th, and this year the 20th fell on sunday. so the president took the official oath in private yesterday in the blue room at the white house. the oath administered by the chief justice john roberts, jr. the public swearing-in and all the pomp and circumstance that go with it were put off until today and what a day it is. the temperature right now is in the high 30s. the sky is clear, a brilliant winter's day in the nation's capital. people are pouring into the national mall to witness a day of history. the first family began the day by attending services at st. john's church. that's right across the street from the white house. that's a long-standing tradition for presidents on inauguration day. joining me now in our cbs coverage is bob schieffer, our c
are not about him. >> what we're celebrating is not the election or swearing in of a president. we're doing celebrate aring each other. >> reporter: and he talked about the most significant of the weekend, he talks about his wife's haircut. >> i love her bangs. she looks good. she always looks good. >> reporter: and it won't end until late monday night when they attend three different ball. and more than a couple hours away before the ceremonies begin. president obama is only the 17 17th president to have a second inaugural. alternate the u.s. capitol, susan mcginnis, back to you. >> thank you so much. and of course cbs news will provide live coverage of today's inauguration festivities, it begins on cbs 5 and will run until 1 in the afternoon and no noon newscast today. cbs 5 will have reports from christin ayers in washington in the next half hour and during our 5 and 6:00 newscasts this evening. >>> it's 42 lovely degrees in washington right now. >> it's so cold there. >> chilly out there. chilly around the bay area. we have numbers around the 20s
in election in two years. >> this and other difficulties appeared miles away as mr. obama recited the constitutional oath that cemented the start of his new term. >> i did it. >> sasha was referring to the mix jum four years ago where the chief justice and the president said some of the words of the oath out of sequence prompting a do-over here at the white house a couple of hours later. as sasha said nobody messed up this time and as said a couple of moments ago, that's probably not too bad. >>> robert gibbs was an adviser to the obama campaign and served as the white house's first press secretary. welcome. >> thank you. >> you have seen it you have read it, characterize it. >> i think it's hopeful, and it talks about the values and the visions and the ideals that bring us to this very moment as america. you'll hear the president talk a lot about what we have to do in this country together to make progress on the big challenges that we face. and, look, it's not just -- one party can't solve these issues. not even just those in government can tackle these
it's brightest stars? it seemed so the night of california's 1968 presidential primary election. robert kennedy had just won with 46% of the vote. he would thank his supporters for the victory that seemed almost certain to take him to the presidency. leaving the podium, on his way to meet with reporters, he took a shortcut through the kitchen. then america's hope already so badly battered by the murder of martin luther king was dashed into darkness by the bullet of one small man. >> oh my god. senator kennedy has been shot. >> jesus why. >> shoot it, shoot it. >> my brother need not be idolized or in large in death beyond what he was in life, to be remembered simply as a good and decent man, who saw wrong and tried to right it. saw suffering and tried to heal it, saw war and tried to stop it. those of us who loved him and who take him to his rest today, pray that what he was to us, and what he wished for others will some day come to pass for all the world. as he said many times, in many parts of this nation, to those he touched and who sought to touch him, some men see things as
election. for now, the next 18 months, obama's going to drive the agenda here in washington. this is the best time for him to get through immigration reform, gun control. this is the time for him right now -- this next year particularly is when he has the most influence that he'll have. >> do you concur with that? if you do, what does that say about the last two years of eight years for a president in the white house? >> it says a lot over the last couple of years about campaigning and doing politics, which is normal for the modern presidency. i disagree a little bit with perry. i think the president has these first 100 days. beyond that, it's dependent upon the state of the economy. that's going to be a determinate factor. >> you say 18 months. you say 100 days. you're tough. >> 100 days, then we'll see. >> there's a new political article i want to go on. it says democratic senators in red states may break with the white house. part of the quote from the article reads as follows -- senior democratic senators and aides say the president must face a stark political reality ev
dynamics on the hill. a republican house that was elected within their districts by large margins and president who won an election. how do we bridge the gap? how do we actually get the deal done. >> we have a system that is incremental in nature. we're not a parliamentary system where, if you control the government, you can move very quickly and aggressively. i have always said that the american politics is played on the 40-yard line. and both sides feel very strongly about their philosophical position. but there is a deep identity of interest that i think needs -- leads to premature should lead to agreement. if you're the president of united states, there are two events that you know may occur in the next four years, which could totally derail your capacity to do the of the things you want to do about the nation, your positive agenda. the first is the terrorist and weapons of mass destruction. i think this president has been dedicated to intelligence gathering and his use of various capabilities to reduce that threat. and secondly, the issue of the financial crisis driven by the
confident from his re-election. some might use the word cocky, and that he has become more partisan and more hard nosed. would you agree with that sae assessment? >> and is it by necessity or choice? >> no, i think he's become -- he's practical. and if the other side is going to take a position that they're going to oppose you on every initiative, you have to seek national support. in a democracy, people push policy forward not the politicians and so that's a lesson that he has drawn from the first term. that said, as far as i can -- as i know, and as i know him, his door is always open to people who are willing to work together to solve problems and one hopes in the next four years there will be a spirit of cooperation. understand we're never going to agree on anything. that's why we have two parties. in order to move the country forward we have to move together. >> david axelrod, always good to see you. >> good to see you, savannah. >> i know you'll be watching. we will have more on the second inauguration, but first natalie morales has a check of the other top stories. good morning. >> go
the president for a moa. he's only the 16th president ever elected to two consecutive terms. we've heard a lot about second term curses that have brought down richard nixon, hampered ronald reagan, bill clinton. people forget reagan was able to get tax reform, bill clinton was able to get a balanced budget. certainly a big opportunity for the president but fully aware in the white house, a lot of challenges ahead as well, jenna. >> certainly not challenges for a father. nice to see the first family, ed, and how much the girls have grown up over the last four years. what we're looking at for the president tomorrow besides the hair styles and what everybody is wearing at the inauguration is what is he going to say? what will be the address to the nation tomorrow? you mentioned some policy challenges ahead. what are you hearing about tomorrow's address and how that might set the table, if you will, for the years to come? >> true. what i'm hearing is the state of the union address next month is really where the president will go with a deeper dive on policy, whether it be gun control, immigration
oaths since fdr, he was elected four times. the challenge for president obama this time is to recapture the energy and enthusiasm of four years ago when a record 1.8 million people descended on washington to witness the history-making swearing-in of the nation's first african american president. nobody expects a crowd that big again. this time, the president will have his hand on two bibles. abraham lincoln's and martin luther king's. in a video released by the white house, the president explained why. >> letting them know there's a connection between me being here and the sacrifices of those in the past, which i think is entirely fitting. >> the man who ran obama's re-election campaign says the president will use his big speech tomorrow, in part, to reach out to some of those who voted against him. >> you'll see a president who wants to work across party lines to get things done. i think that's what the country wants. >> reporter: after today's oath was complete, the president's 11-year-old daughter was happy to see dad got the words right. >> i did it. >> you didn't mess up. >> we got
. >> good afternoon. i am the first elected of newtown, the scene of the most horrific event that took place at sandy hook elementary school in which we lost 26 children and staff members. i am here to show support for those initiatives late out today by vice president biden and president obama. both of those members said our world has changed because of what happened at sandy hook. par contest as has been raised. we have the obligation to address. if that is so, change will take place. i would hate to find myself a year from now reading about another of that -- another event. i truly believe the will of the people make a difference. i am calling on everyone to have the courage to stand up and help us make that difference. we should never again visit a tragedy such as we had in newtown. i call on everyone of you as mothers and fathers and members of a reasonable society to know it is time for us to make a change. please do everything you can to support common sense policies. we need to know that we are the answer to this problem. thank you. >> hi, i'm president of the brady campaign. i come
in the election. a debate, some conservatives don't want a new immigration policy that allows those who came illegally to stay. some democrats don't want to touch medicare, social security. if you have a grand bargain who is the circuit breaker so everybody can talk together and things get done as opposed to confrontation? >> well, and this is the time to do it. there are big things that need to be done for the country with regard to immigration. immigration is the backbone of the country. that's what your country is built on. legal immigration. we have to move forward with immigration reform, marco rubio. >> senator, forgive me for interrupting, but as we move forward on immigration, your words, are you prepared, and do you think a majority of republicans are prepared, to give some legal status, whether full citizenship or legal status, to the full 8 million people here in this country illegally? >> this is something that needs to be discussed and debating. we have been debating it and discussing within our policy lunches. marco rubio is raising a number of different ways we can deal with t
fulfilled its responsibility in that regard in the last two years and went through the fire in the election. i think that's fair. the senate just simply has not. and it is discouraging. you know, it just takes 51 votes. that's all it takes over there. i actually heard commentators tell us, oh, no, it takes 60. it takes no such thing. it just takes 51 votes where the majority now has 55 and at one point had 59 and was unable to -- unwilling, i should say, get 51 where you got over 228 of our members do last year which was actually vote on a budget going into an election year. mr. chairman, i'm delighted to see legs like this. i do think there are legitimate constitutional questions. i think those we'll have a vigorous discussion about that in the next couple of days. i'm comforted by some of the precedence you cite, mr. chairman. at the end of the day, this is about getting us to do our jobs. there isn't a member up here that wouldn't tell you it really is our obligation to write a budget. again, our friends in the majority did not. i'm really happy to see the minority, they have chosen to d
and was elected to the michigan state senate in 1964 and service the senate minority leader. under the current administration he was under the agency for international development and was elected to the house in 1980 to four years after his brother carl was elected to the senate. in march 2010, he won the battle of chairman of the ways and means committee. there is no embargo and breakfast is over except that c-span has agreed not to use video of the sessions session for at least two hours after the represent. to help c-span, if you happen to be sitting there microphone and you ask a question, pullet close to you. if not, they will come around you with a boom microphone. finally, if you send me a signal, i will do my best to answer questions and comments. >> thank you all for joining us. i was thinking yesterday as i was listening to the president about past conflicts over the deficit reduction. mark and i were talking about how far back we go. it is a few years. and i remembered him of the earlier sessions that we had. gramm-rudman one and two and gran member holland. i've googled it for all
. the president, vice president, members of congress, all elected and appointed officials of the united states of america. we are here to ask blessings upon our armed forces, blessings upon all who contribute to the essence of the american spir yit, the american dream, the opportunity to become whatever our mankind, woman kind allows us to be. this is the promise of america. as we sing the words of belief, this is my country, let us act upon the meaning that everyone is included. may inherit dignitiy and inalienable rights of everyone, man, boy, and girl be honored. may all of your people, especially the least the these flourish in our blessed nation. 150 years after the emancipation proclamation and 50 years after the march on washington, we celebrate the spirit of our ancestors which has allowed us to move from a nation of unborn hopes and a history of disenfranchised votes to today's expression of a more perfect union. we are ask too, al mightily, that where our paths seem blanketed by throngs of oppression and rippled by pangs of despair, we ask for your guidance toward the light of delive
backlash against democratic members of congress who voted for that in the 1994 midterm elections. what the white house believes may be different this time, not just newtown, but this whole series of tragedies like tucson, aurora, colorado, and newtown having some children killed, they think the political dynamic has changed. we shall see, jenna. jenna: we will see if it sets the tone for the second term of the president which is about to officially begin. back to the white house as news develops. thanks very much. jon: before bringing his proposals to the president the vice president met with representativesing from the entertainment and videogame industry and other lawmakers attacked hollywood over increasing violence portrayed. so what will the president do? will there be any pushes for changes in the videogame and entertainment industries? chief washington correspondent james rosen live in our d.c. bureau with more on that. do we know yet, whether the obama-biden proposals, james, contain anything as far as hollywood and the gaming industry are concerned? >> reporter: we don't, jon.
on guns, against regulation, come out and vote in midterm elections on that single issue. the big question now is, be after newtown, whether those who support regulation can become single issue voters in favor of regulation and whether they can mobilize enough support to pressure members of congress to either change their views or moderate their views a bit so they can get some of this package through. so take away some of the intensity from the nra voters. >> take a look at these numbers in these polls and you're digging deep. how realistic is the american public when it comes to the whole issue of gun control? >> i think the public is quite realistic. take a look at this. while the public clearly favors gun control and you see here that 55% favor gun control, 44% oppose. so that's quite a hefty 11-point margin. but then when you ask the question of whether you believe that gun control is going to fix violence in this country, look at this, by a two to one margin people say, you know what, this alone is not going to fix the problem. they understand that there are lots of factors that go i
and its citizens, not the election results. also vice president joe biden and his family greeted supporters at the latino inaugural party. >> hundreds of thousands are gathering on the national mall to see history being made. >> and while officials say right now there is no credible threat, security, as you can imagine, is once again extremely tight. >> reporter: they will be everywhere, snipers dotting roof tops, the coast guard patrolling waterways, military fighter jets enforcing a no-fly zone. 13,000 security personnel bla blanketing the washington mall. >> with this number of people coming, it requires a lot of coordination and organization. >> reporter: all coordinating here. the multiagency communications center overseen by the secret service at an undisclosed location. they'll monitor intelligence threats. the 2009 inauguration was a logistical nightmare, hundreds getting stuck in this tunnel. authorities say this time it will be better. >> there will be such a different feel when you come down this time for the inauguration. there is extensive signage. we have social med
.s. house received 1.1 million more votes than republicans in the last election cycle. but republicans still won a 33- seat grigoriy and house. how? the report says -- it goes on to detail how republicans but millions of dollars in those states feeling state level victories that allowed republicans to spearhead redistricting for the 2012 election to their party's advantage. the group says it raised $30 million for the initiative. and the united nations is criticizing the u.s.-backed regime in saudi arabia for the beheading of a free lankan guest worker. -- be heading of a sri lanka guest worker. she was decapitated over allegations of murdering the baby of her employer. the spokesperson for the men high commissioner for human rights condemned the execution. >> we express our deep dismay at the execution of a young sri lanka and women on wednesday. -- a young woman on wednesday. she can to work as a house made in 2005, was charged for the murder of her employers' pay the a week after her arrival. despite a birth certificate that allegedly showed she was a minor at the time of the baby's death
% disapprove. that's pretty much where he was around election day. for the second month in a row, though, the president is right side up in terms of his handling of the economy. about equal but doing a little better. meanwhile meanwhile, 14% of americans approve of congress. 49% hold a negative view of the republican party. that's the lowest the gop has been since 2008. 38% view the democratic party negatively. and take note, everybody. monday the "morning joe" crew will be in d.c. on capitol hill. special coverage of president obama's inauguration. everything will kick off here at 5:30 a.m. eastern time monday with a special edition of "way too early." >>> as always, you can let us know why you're awake right now. shoot us an e-mail at waytooearly@msnbc.com. or you can tweet m me @markhalperin. >>> still ahead, the hoax heard around the sport world. manti te'o exercises his right to remain silent, but there are new details coming up from his past interviews that are being made public. the question is, who was the real victim of the deception? was it te'o or the fans? >>> plus, stephen c
the recent election results that they need to get healthy with hispanic voter. they were way on the downside of that growing constituency. very important in swing states out in the west part of the united states, as well as in florida and some of the east coast states, as well. so that is going to push them to the bargaining table on the issue of immigration. he's got less of an auspicious landscape in front of him on issues like energy and climate change. and of course on guns which is an issue that events have pushed to the forefront. he's going to have a rough time getting that priority through the congress. >> you mention immigration being one of those big-ticket items, of course, health care was the signature big-ticket item of the first term. what else is on the list this time around? >> well, he's got immigration, he's got overseeing the implementation of the health care law which, of course, hasn't really fully taken effect. he's got energy and climate which is really the big undone story from the first term. he did not get that cap and trade bill. and he's not going to get it which
. the american people reacted and reacted almost instantly in those of a term elections. in 1994 in the reaction to that assault weapons ban is likely vivid in the memories of senator reid to a perhaps the speaker as well. the speaker's spokesman said if the senate does pass an assault weapons ban the house will take a look at it, but if he does bring it up it would be the third time this year that the speaker would violate the rule requiring him to have at least 50 percent support from his or her own caucus before bringing legislation to the floor. to be clear, he faces an important source. should senator reid decide to send legislation his way, he has a very important ramifications, and it is important to decide just which party he is heading up because he is at the forefront of what is now a fight on taxes, spending, the size of government cut debt, and no gun-control. it appears to be a fight for the very soul of the republican party. the nra calls the president and its lead is typical. the president calls the nra cowardly. why does this argument matter? the "a-team" will be here to talk abo
to die in the american desert. the suffering must end. we look forward to working with our elected officials and all of good will toward this end. granted. -- thank you. >> as you can see by this range of perspective, the differences are not great but the unity is clear. the congress must take advantage of the opportunity to pass broad immigration reform. i would like to take questions from the press. please introduce yourself, your name as well as your outlook. >> i would like to hear more about the republican super pac. jeb bush, would they be a part of that? >> at this point -- the, we are getting all the paperwork and -- together and we should be ready to go soon. obviously the role of the super pac is to raise money that we can use to support immigration in districts where a republican is supportive. we cannot give the money to a candid it or say vote for this man or this woman. but we can support the concept in those critical districts. you will have to ask governor bush what his plans are and what he is doing. i would assume that anything related to immigration will catch hi
and a year beforehand preparing for whomever is elected in november and as someone who participated in in the macrofor president obama four years ago and with absolutely no idea what we are doing i can tell you that the folks regardless of who the chair is in the folks at gtf are there ready for you when you walk in the door and really gives a lot of logistical lift on this. is their job to make sure the presidents in print is put on some of these events. one of the ways we do that is in the parade along with all of these military elements there are 58 different groups, 58 different vehicles from all 50 states. they are everything from the virginia military institute across the river of virginia in southern virginia which is marched in another of not grow growth rates all the way through one of my favorites, a group from maine a group of unicyclers that will be joining us and called the gym dandies. and gym in this case. the president will stand and watch the entire thing and enjoy the parade along with thousands of folks who come down and are watching from along the parade route. o
] >> now give me great pleasure to introduce a newly elected colleague from connecticut who will introduce our first witness and that is congresswoman elizabeth espy from connecticut no whose district sandy hook elementary school resides. and what we will do is have all of the various members introduce our witnesses and then we will proceed with the testimony. congresswoman esty. >> thank you so much to my good friend, rosa delauro. and thank you to all of you for being here with us today. as witnesses to what happened in our community of newtown, connecticut, and as a call to action for what we must do as a country. i'm honored today to have the chance to introduce janet robinson who has become a good friend, who is a true american hero, who responded in a time of unbelievable tragedy. for five years dr. janet robinson has served as the superintendent of schools in newtown, connecticut. throughout her career she has shown a constant and loving commitment to education and improving the lives of children. in addition to having served as superintendent of schools in three different connecti
should be done. but you have probably more than any group of elected officials thought about this issue more intently and longer. you have done a great deal of work on this. all of you who deal with the issue every day. i'm not going to ask for a show of hands, but if i did, a lot of people would put their hands up in this room. how many of you mayors attended the funeral of a police officer or an innocent child in a drive-by shooting or shop owner in your city? many of you, many of you have had to attend and many of you, many, many funerals. some of your communities experienced mass shootings, not just in schools, but movie theaters and temples and not unique to big cities. it was -- i happened to be literally, probably turned out to be a quarter of a mile back in 2006 at an outing when i heard gunshots in the woods that we didn't know where we thought there were hunters. i got back to the clubhouse in this outing and saw helicopters. it was a shooting that had just taken place in a small amish school just outside of lancaster, pennsylvania. so it's not just big cities or well-to-do su
food. i mean these are people who have mastered it. he was re-elected president of the united states with over a majority of the vote. with an economy that can only be described as suffering and troubled. so he understands the politics of it. he knows that it is an uphill fight. but the reality is and police officers will tell you as well, police chiefs in particular, is it is the impulsive end. and it's the idea of multideaths at a time which is what a gun can do. i mean it's not-- we have changed the culture in this country as as far as smoking has concerned. when i was a pfc, cigarettes were $2 a carton. now it's $9 for a pack of cigarettes and there is a stigma. we don't see smoking in movies any more. we don't see that same level of social acceptance. i mean i think the culture is part of it, no doubt about it. >> if i could just one on the politics, i think the ambitiousness of the proposals was politically savvy. because it will allow a lot of senators from marginal areas who are swinging in the mid thrill to say well i'm not for the assault weapons ban, that's too far. but i
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